Who is Liz Truss?

Mary Elizabeth Truss is the new Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and Leader of the Conservative Party since September 2022.

Liz Truss, Britain’s foreign secretary, takes over Tuesday as the country’s leader, he has very clear ideological roots – originally as a Liberal Democrat.

Her rapid rise to the top started in 2010 when she was first elected to Parliament in 2010. She proved her success in the exercise of political power and pursues her agenda with relentless vigor and unequivocal enthusiasm.

She was born in 1975 into a family that she herself has described as “to the left of Labour,” Britain’s main left-wing party. She grew up in parts of the UK that didn’t traditionally vote Conservative, moving between Scotland and the north of England.

In contrast with her privately educated cabinet colleagues, Truss went to a state school in the Yorkshire city of Leeds and later won a place at Oxford University. There she was an active member of the Liberal Democrats, a centrist opposition party that has long been an effective opponent to the Conservatives in large parts of England.

During her time as a member of the Liberal Democratic Party, Truss supported the abolition of the monarchy and the legalization of cannabis; positions that are in stark contrast to the mainstream Conservative Party.

Truss says that in 1996, barely two years after speaking at a Liberal Democrats conference in favor of abolishing the monarchy, she joined the Conservative Party.

Even during her time as a member of the Liberal Democrats, her honesty was questioned by her peers, highlighting traits they say they still see in her today.

Truss undoubtedly managed to keep her audience interested. Since becoming a member of the Conservative Party and becoming a member of parliament, she has keenly backed almost every imaginable viewpoint. She dutifully served under three prime ministers, in numerous ministerial roles, the latest of which was Minister of Foreign Affairs.

She specifically favored staying in the EU during the 2016 UK referendum. The Trust tweeted at the time that it was in favor of those who wished to remain in the EU because “it is in Britain’s economic interest and allows us to concentrate on crucial economic and social changes in the UK.” She now supports Brexit, saying her pre-referendum fears that it could cause “turmoil” were wrong.

The Truss government will probably resemble Johnson’s in many ways, albeit with a stronger emphasis on tax reduction and maybe a more confrontational approach to Europe.