Rawya Masnour is the first Egyptian woman to be awarded membership in Prince Albert’s Environmental Society.

Rawya Masnour is the first Egyptian woman to be awarded membership in Prince Albert’s Environmental Society.

Acooeding to Daily news, Egypt is still reaping the benefits of its proudly hosted COP27, as Prince Albert II of Monaco has inducted Rawya Mansour, CEO of Ramsco Egypt and Oasis Technologies Monaco, into the prestigious Planetary Health Pledge Club.

Rawya has been named one of Africa’s Most Influential Leaders for 2019 in recognition of her environmental conservation efforts crystallized in her entrepreneurial business projects for organic farming and waste recycling showcased in several events and panels during COP27.

The Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation, founded in June 2006, is dedicated to pioneering efforts in environmental conservation and sustainable development on both a local and global scale.

Rawya Mansour said she was “pleased and proud to be the first Egyptian woman to be awarded the Membership of the Planetary Health Pledge Club alongside laureates such as Anges M. Kalibata, the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for 2021 Food Systems Summit and Dame Jane Francis the first female director of the British Antarctic Survey.

During the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties in Sharm El Sheikh, women were visible in a variety of fields. The Gender Day at COP27, in particular, highlighted numerous achievements that emphasized the importance of women’s empowerment and gender equality on the path to SDG fulfilment.

Rawya’s projects to date have centred on organic farming and food waste recycling via “green coal,” a novel method developed to reduce GHG emissions. During the Cairo Climate Summit, the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation hosted the third edition of its Ocean Innovators program to encourage innovation, initiative, and investment in a blue, sustainable economy.

The Ministry of Manpower publishes a report on gender equality and protection of women’s rights at work.

The Ministry of Manpower publishes a report on gender equality and protection of women’s rights at work.

The Ministry of Manpower’s Media Centre published a report on “The Gender Equality Unit,” intending to publicize the Unit’s history and role in supporting gender equality issues and the protection of women in the workplace, following Egyptian State policies that regard women as half of society and gave birth to the other half.

According to the issued report, the Egyptian State, which is taking serious steps to support women in all fields, establish the principle of equal opportunities and raise awareness regarding women’s rights, duties and employment, is keen to continue to involve women in work and production and decision-making.

The Gender Equality Unit of the Ministry of Manpower was launched with the International Labour Organization “National Plan for the Promotion of Gender Equality in Employment”, which aims to create a possible, supportive and safe framework for both women and men in employment by promoting women’s participation in the workforce and leadership positions and create a safe working environment free from violence or discrimination.

Arab Women’s Organization hold workshop addressing ‘increasing violence against women

Arab Women’s Organization hold workshop addressing ‘increasing violence against women’

According to Egypt today, The Arab Women’s Organization holed a workshop yesterday addressing “the phenomenon of increasing violence against women in the Arab world,” with the participation of a group of Arab women and men experts.

Dr Fadia Kiwan, the organization’s Director General, confirmed that the workshop is part of the organization’s activities to participate in the international campaign to combat violence against women, which runs for 16 days.

She added that the workshop discusses the reasons for the increase in the phenomenon of violence against women and the Arab legislation that address it, as well as present case studies on the increase in violence against women in the public sphere, in addition to cyber violence, violence during wars and conflicts, and domestic violence, as well as propose solutions to contain the phenomenon of increasing violence.

PAHO calls for improved health service response to violence against women

PAHO calls for improved health service response to violence against women

Washington, D.C., November 30, 2022 (PAHO) — The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) this week launched a new report assessing the status of health sector responses to violence against women, and called on countries to accelerate the full implementation of strategies to address this pervasive public health and human rights problem in the region of the Americas.

The report, “Addressing violence against women in health policies and protocols in the Americas: a regional status report” is the first of its kind. It reviews policies in PAHO’s 35 Member States and offers a roadmap for health systems to join a multisectoral effort to address the issue.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), one out of every three women in the Americas experience physical and/or sexual violence during their lifetime. Intimate partner violence is the most common form of violence against women, and up to 66 million women and girls are estimated to have experienced this form of violence in the region.

“We know that violence is preventable, which is why the sheer number of women and girls affected by this in our region is particularly shocking,” said Dr. Anselm Hennis, Director of Noncommunicable Diseases and Mental Health at PAHO. “We know more today than ever before about what works to prevent violence against women, so this situation is unacceptable,” he added.

The repercussions of violence against women are devastating, not only for their individual health and well-being, but for entire families and communities. Consequences include a broad range of physical, sexual, reproductive, and mental health problems.

The health sector has a key role to play in preventing or mitigating the impact of violence against women and the new report highlights that 83% of PAHO Member States have included this issue in their health plans or policies.

“Making violence against women visible and including it in national health policies and plans sets the tone for engagement on this important topic,” said Britta Baer, Regional Advisor on Violence Prevention at PAHO. “Often without guidance and policies from health ministries, the issue is not prioritised by governments,” she added.

As health workers often treat survivors of violence and are viewed as trusted individuals, the report highlights their key role in early intervention and in the provision of essential care and support. For this to work, however, health workers require an evidence-based protocol.

The report shows that 60% of countries in the region have at least one such protocol but warns that more needs to be done to enhance their quality and to align them with best practices, Baer explained, especially for first-line support.

PAHO considers first-line support as one of the minimum levels of health care survivors of violence against women should receive. First-line support is known by the acronym LIVES, which stands for: listen with empathy, inquire about their needs, validate their experiences, enhance their safety and support them to connect with additional services. The report indicates that only 54% of Member States included some aspect of first-line support in their protocols.

Detailed health sector protocols are important as they support health workers in understanding what is expected and enable a faster response. “This is particularly relevant in the response to sexual violence, where every hour counts in providing quality care and in mitigating consequences,” Baer said.

The report was launched during the week to mark 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence. This international campaign takes place every year between the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women (25 November) and Human Rights Day (10 December) to spur action to prevent and eliminate violence against women and girls.

“The Region has made impressive progress and has the potential to lead change on the ground by sharing experience with other regions,” Dr. Hennis said. “COVID-19 put the clock back on many advances, so we must focus on regaining ground to reach the 2025 targets in preventing violence and responding to the needs of women and girls in the Americas,” he added.

ALEXBANK Offers Women’s Personal Finance Programs without Administrative Charges Until December 29, 2022

ALEXBANK Offers Women’s Personal Finance Programs without Administrative Charges Until December 29, 2022

On its official Facebook page, ALEXBANK announced its support for working women on the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

ALEXBANK supports working women through personal finance programs with no administrative costs in the period from November 27 to December 29.

ALEXBANK Bank offers a distinct range of personal finance programs (Personal Finance with Job Guarantee, Personal Finance for Bank Employees, Personal Finance with Pension Guarantee, Personal Finance for Car Purchase).

The bank provides these programs with a package of benefits, the most important of which are a financing value of up to EGP 3 million, a repayment period of up to 12 years, and the option of deferring premiums for a year for customers of the salary transfer program whose entire salary is transferred to ALEXBANK.

31% of Egyptian wives experienced domestic abuse in 2021: CAPMAS

31% of Egyptian wives experienced domestic abuse in 2021: CAPMAS

According to ahram online, thirty-one per cent of currently or previously married Egyptian women aged between 15 and 49 were subjected to some form of physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by their spouses in 2021, by the Egyptian Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

According to the most recent Egyptian Family Survey results, 22.2 per cent of married women have experienced psychological abuse at the hands of their husbands, while 25.5 per cent have experienced physical abuse.

Furthermore, 26.1 per cent of the women in the same category experienced both physical and psychological abuse, according to CAPMAS in a statement commemorating the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, which is observed annually on 25 November.

Egypt recently established 26 anti-domestic-violence units at university hospitals to assist women across the country, as well as eight equipped medical response units at public and private university hospitals for violence survivors. Egypt has also raised penalties for violence against women – including female genital mutilation – to serious prison terms.

The Ministry of Social Solidarity and the National Council for Women (NCW) launched 16-day campaigns to combat violence against women. The campaigns, which run till 10 December, aim to combat all forms of violence against women and create local momentum to find solutions to the problem.

One out of every four young women (aged 15 to 24) has experienced violence, while 27 per cent of married women (aged 15 to 49) have reported being subjected to some form of violence by their husbands, CAPMAS added in its statement, citing statistics by the World Health Organization.

The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

Maya Morsi, the President of the National Council for Women, participated in the fourth meeting of the Facilitative Committee of Partners of the Joint Program “Promoting productive and decent work for women in Egypt, Jordan and Palestine”, hosted by Egypt, to promote knowledge-sharing among Governments, development partners, employers, civil society organizations and United Nations agencies in the three countries.

Maya Morsi stated that one of the most difficult challenges facing the program is ensuring a strong presence of women in the workforce, pointing out that one of the factors causing low rates of female labour-force participation is the high cost of childcare and housework. Whereas changing legislation is simple, implementing it is difficult due to ideas, a rigid mentality, and a stereotypical view of women’s work.

She drew attention to a 2018 study on the economic empowerment of women conducted by the National Council for Women in collaboration with the World Bank, which identified the most prominent sectors for women’s employment, as the media, information, and communication technology industries experienced rapid growth while also providing effective tools to advance the development and social justice.

Recommendations on the protection of women human rights defenders at risk in migration contexts

Recommendations on the protection of women human rights defenders at risk in migration contexts

These recommendations are the first of their kind and underline the critical role migrant women human rights defenders play in securing the rights of people on the move.

Migrant women human rights defenders include women, girls, and gender-diverse persons of all ages who promote and protect the human rights of people on the move, whether they are migrants themselves or not, regardless of their migration status, and irrespective of whether they self-identify as a woman human rights defender.

These recommendations are a call to action to all stakeholders to recognize and address the risks facing migrant women human rights defenders and put in place measures to promote and protect human rights unhindered so that migrants in all their diversity can live, work, and move safely and with dignity.

Under the patronage of the Prime Minister, UNWomen, UNFPA and WFP collaborated with the Department for Women’s Empowerment to launch the 16 days of activism campaign to combat violence against women and girls

Under the patronage of the Prime Minister, UNWomen, UNFPA and WFP collaborated with the Department for Women’s Empowerment to launch the 16 days of activism campaign to combat violence against women and girls

27 November 2022, Baghdad, Iraq A conference was held to launch the campaign for the 16 days of activism to end violence against women, under the patronage of the Prime Minister Mr. Mohamed Shiaa Al-Sudani, and in collaboration with the Department for Women’s Empowerment at the Council of Ministers, and in partnership with the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UNWomen), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

The conference highlighted the decisive role of Iraqi women in public life, through government positions, civil society, and human rights movements in preventing and eliminating violence against women and girls (VAWG). It advocated for the ratification of relevant laws, namely the Anti-Domestic Violence Law (ADVL). It was attended by members of Parliament, government, and civil society, including members of the parliamentary women’s committee, the High Judicial Council, ministries of Labour, Interior, Social Affairs, and Health, as well as former members of Parliament, experts and academics. In addition, representatives of the international community attended including the Swedish and French Ambassadors, and the Finnish Deputy Ambassador.

The conference was initiated by Dr. Hamid Naeem Al-Ghazi, the Secretary General of the Council of Ministers, who stated in his speech that combating violence against women (VAWG) is among the main priorities for the government. He affirmed that the development of the Second National Strategy for Iraqi Women (2023-2030) is an important step to providing legal and social protection to women, in line with the Iraqi constitution and governmental plans.

Mr. Mohamed Shiaa Al-Sudani, the Iraqi Prime Minister, expressed his government’s commitment to further promoting gender equality, and ending violence against women, referencing the importance of the National Iraqi Strategy to Combat Violence against Women (2018-2030). He cited the unprecedented appointment of a female minister to a key ministry in his government; Tayf Sami as Finance Minister, as an important step to empowering Iraqi women, but emphasized that more needs to be done. He said that economic reforms cannot be successful without the inclusion of women, and combating corruption can only be possible with women’s support and contribution.

Mrs. Evan Faik, Minister of Displacement and Migration, elaborated on the efforts made by the Ministry to support and protect internally displaced women and girls, highlighting how they face greater risks of violence committed against them.

Dr. Yusra Karim Mohsen, Director General of the Department for Women’s Empowerment, stated that protecting women from VAWG is essential to promoting gender equality in Iraqi society, which is enshrined in Iraq’s constitution, and is in line with the Sustainable Development Goals. She highlighted some of the achievements that the Department has made in this regard including the ongoing implementation of the Second National Plan for the Implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR1325). She also outlined one of the key pillars of the Second National Strategy for Iraqi women, currently being developed, which focuses on the protection of women and girls. She added that this can only be achieved through empowering women and girls themselves, and through ratifying and modifying laws and legislations to protect women and girls, and by providing the necessary infrastructure to support survivors.

Mrs. Jessica Svärdström, Swedish Ambassador, stressed that promoting gender equality and combating gender-based violence is one of Sweden’s main objectives in Iraq, in line with Sweden’s Development Cooperation Framework with Iraq. Similarly, Mr. Eric Chevalier, French Ambassador, expressed his solidarity and support to Iraqi partners in combatting VAWG, and encouraged Iraq to ratify the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence, known as the Istanbul Convention. Mrs. Anna Malinen, Finnish Deputy Ambassador, highlighted Finland’s priority to combat online violence, which is increasingly being used to harm women and girls, thus affecting many aspects of their public and private lives.

Dr. Ammar Abdulqahar, Head of Programmes at UNWomen Iraq, highlighted the UN’s support to its Iraqi partners to combat all forms of violence against women and girls. He said that the UN is supporting a number of strategic preventative and responsive measures, including the development and implementation of key national strategies. He elaborated on the partnerships UNWomen Iraq has in particular with WFP and UNFPA to strengthen Iraqi women’s resilience and improve the access, protection and wellbeing of women and girl survivors of gender-based violence. He also expressed gratitude to the support provided by the Swedish, Finnish and French governments, which has enabled action to be taken on this very important issue.

The speeches were followed by discussions between government, academics and civil society, which focused on the importance of ratifying laws, namely ADVL in order to prevent VAWG, and guarantee the protection of women survivors.

“Break the silence. We stand by you.”

“Break the silence. We stand by you.”

According to UNICEF, “Break the silence. We stand by you.” is a campaign launched yesterday by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the empowerment of Women (UN Women), International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) jointly with the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection of the Republic of Moldova on behalf of the coordination mechanism on gender-based violence in humanitarian settings, the Intersectoral Gender-based Violence (GBV) Sub-Working Group.

The campaign aims to raise awareness of the Republic of Moldova’s prevention and response services for gender-based violence among the refugee and host communities and to send a strong message that there should be no tolerance for any form of GBV.

The initiative begins in conjunction with the 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Against Women and Girls, which calls for coordinated international action to raise awareness, energize advocacy efforts, and share information and innovations in order to put an end to the pandemic of violence against women and girls that has spread throughout the world. The initiatives are part of the UNiTE effort, which aims to eradicate gender-based violence by 2030.

The “Break the silence. We stand by you” joint campaign will run from November 2022 until March 2023 and will promote social cohesion, urging people from all walks of life to acknowledge, take a stand and act against gender-based violence.

Through a series of community outreach events, media partnerships, and social media engagement, the partners will build on the ongoing dialogue about the issue, invite the service providers and the communities to create a supportive environment and raise awareness about the existing services, and foster accountability so that every humanitarian effort provides safe and comprehensive survivor-centered services to those affected or at risk of violence.