Maya Morsi: Egypt is the first country to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women in the Corona pandemic

Maya Morsi: Egypt is the first country to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women in the Corona pandemic

Dr Maya Morsi, President of the National Council for Women, participated in the meeting organized by the World Bank entitled “Policymakers Work with Communities to End Violence against Women – Panel Discussions with the Change Maker” via video conference technology, where Egypt presented its achievements in the file of protecting women from violence and policies laws and protection measures.

She referred to the National Strategy for the Elimination of Violence against Women 2015-2020, which was launched by the Council in coordination and cooperation with the various concerned state agencies as a basic mechanism that would contribute to the protection of women and girls from violent practices against them, in addition to the “National Strategy for the Empowerment of Egyptian Women 2030” launched by the Council within the framework of Sustainable development goals, in line with Egypt’s Vision 2030, and include four main axes: political empowerment and leadership, economic empowerment, social empowerment, and protection from all forms of violence.

The National Council for Women, in cooperation with the United Nations Population Fund and the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS), conducted a study on the economic cost of violence against women, which estimated that 7.9 million Egyptian women suffered from all forms of violence at a cost of at least EGP 2.17 billion.  Egypt was the first country in the Arab world to conduct this survey.

Maya Morsi also explained that Egypt is the first country in the world to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women during the Corona pandemic, as it helped in developing the national response to the pandemic, which included the response to confronting violence against women associated with the outbreak of Corona, and the first country in the world to issue a mechanism To monitor the actions taken by the state in response to women’s needs.

The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

Maya Morsi, the President of the National Council for Women, participated in the fourth meeting of the Facilitative Committee of Partners of the Joint Program “Promoting productive and decent work for women in Egypt, Jordan and Palestine”, hosted by Egypt, to promote knowledge-sharing among Governments, development partners, employers, civil society organizations and United Nations agencies in the three countries.

Maya Morsi stated that one of the most difficult challenges facing the program is ensuring a strong presence of women in the workforce, pointing out that one of the factors causing low rates of female labour-force participation is the high cost of childcare and housework. Whereas changing legislation is simple, implementing it is difficult due to ideas, a rigid mentality, and a stereotypical view of women’s work.

She drew attention to a 2018 study on the economic empowerment of women conducted by the National Council for Women in collaboration with the World Bank, which identified the most prominent sectors for women’s employment, as the media, information, and communication technology industries experienced rapid growth while also providing effective tools to advance the development and social justice.