The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

The National Council for Women reveals the reasons for women’s low labour-force participation.

Maya Morsi, the President of the National Council for Women, participated in the fourth meeting of the Facilitative Committee of Partners of the Joint Program “Promoting productive and decent work for women in Egypt, Jordan and Palestine”, hosted by Egypt, to promote knowledge-sharing among Governments, development partners, employers, civil society organizations and United Nations agencies in the three countries.

Maya Morsi stated that one of the most difficult challenges facing the program is ensuring a strong presence of women in the workforce, pointing out that one of the factors causing low rates of female labour-force participation is the high cost of childcare and housework. Whereas changing legislation is simple, implementing it is difficult due to ideas, a rigid mentality, and a stereotypical view of women’s work.

She drew attention to a 2018 study on the economic empowerment of women conducted by the National Council for Women in collaboration with the World Bank, which identified the most prominent sectors for women’s employment, as the media, information, and communication technology industries experienced rapid growth while also providing effective tools to advance the development and social justice.

Diplomat says Egypt made unprecedented progress in promoting women rights

Diplomat says Egypt made unprecedented progress in promoting women rights
Spokesman for the Foreign Ministry Ahmed Abu Zeid said Egypt made an unprecedented progress in protecting and promoting women rights, thanks to the enlightened political will that respects them and sees that the protection and empowerment of women as a national duty and an inherent human right.

The spokesman made the remarks on his Twitter account to mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, which is observed on November 25 of each year.

Music, passion, and powerful women: Launch of amplifyHER, an exciting new UN podcast

Music, passion, and powerful women: Launch of amplifyHER, an exciting new UN podcast

Today, the UN launches amplifyHER; a vibrant, music-filled podcast, celebrating exciting women artists from around the world.

According to UN, many women produce art in the face of, and sometimes inspired by, the challenges they face in society, whether related to insecurity, human rights, climate change, inequality, or simply because of their gender.

The series is a compelling blend of music, interviews, and natural sound, featuring inspiring female musicians from various cultural backgrounds discussing their challenges as women in a male-dominated industry, how they’ve overcome obstacles, and what motivates them to keep creating music.

“Making this series was a joy,” says the amplifyHER presenter, Laura Quinoñes. “I was able to have conversations with these huge talents, who felt comfortable being vulnerable with me, speaking to me from their safe spaces: studios, kitchens, even their bedrooms!”

With help from music entertainment company SoundCloud, which is committed to supporting women artists, the UN team identified 10 women artists, representing a diverse range of countries and cultures

amplifyHER is dedicated to women and girls everywhere, particularly to those whose dreams and aspirations are unfulfilled, due to discrimination and oppression.

“The empowerment of women and girls, as well as the achievement of gender equality, are central to the United Nations’ mission,” says Melissa Fleming, the UN’s head of Global Communications.