Maya Morsi: Egypt is the first country to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women in the Corona pandemic

Maya Morsi: Egypt is the first country to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women in the Corona pandemic

Dr Maya Morsi, President of the National Council for Women, participated in the meeting organized by the World Bank entitled “Policymakers Work with Communities to End Violence against Women – Panel Discussions with the Change Maker” via video conference technology, where Egypt presented its achievements in the file of protecting women from violence and policies laws and protection measures.

She referred to the National Strategy for the Elimination of Violence against Women 2015-2020, which was launched by the Council in coordination and cooperation with the various concerned state agencies as a basic mechanism that would contribute to the protection of women and girls from violent practices against them, in addition to the “National Strategy for the Empowerment of Egyptian Women 2030” launched by the Council within the framework of Sustainable development goals, in line with Egypt’s Vision 2030, and include four main axes: political empowerment and leadership, economic empowerment, social empowerment, and protection from all forms of violence.

The National Council for Women, in cooperation with the United Nations Population Fund and the Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS), conducted a study on the economic cost of violence against women, which estimated that 7.9 million Egyptian women suffered from all forms of violence at a cost of at least EGP 2.17 billion.  Egypt was the first country in the Arab world to conduct this survey.

Maya Morsi also explained that Egypt is the first country in the world to issue a rapid response policy towards the situation of women during the Corona pandemic, as it helped in developing the national response to the pandemic, which included the response to confronting violence against women associated with the outbreak of Corona, and the first country in the world to issue a mechanism To monitor the actions taken by the state in response to women’s needs.

31% of Egyptian wives experienced domestic abuse in 2021: CAPMAS

31% of Egyptian wives experienced domestic abuse in 2021: CAPMAS

According to ahram online, thirty-one per cent of currently or previously married Egyptian women aged between 15 and 49 were subjected to some form of physical, sexual, or psychological abuse by their spouses in 2021, by the Egyptian Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics (CAPMAS).

According to the most recent Egyptian Family Survey results, 22.2 per cent of married women have experienced psychological abuse at the hands of their husbands, while 25.5 per cent have experienced physical abuse.

Furthermore, 26.1 per cent of the women in the same category experienced both physical and psychological abuse, according to CAPMAS in a statement commemorating the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, which is observed annually on 25 November.

Egypt recently established 26 anti-domestic-violence units at university hospitals to assist women across the country, as well as eight equipped medical response units at public and private university hospitals for violence survivors. Egypt has also raised penalties for violence against women – including female genital mutilation – to serious prison terms.

The Ministry of Social Solidarity and the National Council for Women (NCW) launched 16-day campaigns to combat violence against women. The campaigns, which run till 10 December, aim to combat all forms of violence against women and create local momentum to find solutions to the problem.

One out of every four young women (aged 15 to 24) has experienced violence, while 27 per cent of married women (aged 15 to 49) have reported being subjected to some form of violence by their husbands, CAPMAS added in its statement, citing statistics by the World Health Organization.